Do Succulents Flower?

Do Succulents Flower?

When I first started with succulents I had no idea how many of them produced flowers and how many they would produce.  Some succulents do not produce flowers, some produce flowers and then die, some flower in spring and some flower during the winter.  Some do not flower until they are mature plants and others will flower when they are less than a year old.  They can be star shaped, tubular, dangle like a bell or look like any other flowering plant.

However, a large majority of succulents do flower and they flower profusely as well.  Just like many other flowering plants most succulents tend to flower during Spring. Different succulents can flower from spring and summer to autumn and winter. Therefore, just as with other types of plants your garden can look beautiful in Spring (or anytime of the year) if you only have succulents in your garden.

As usual, in the amazing world of succulents there are a many and varied flowers which all look amazing with brilliant shape and colours.  There is a common appearance between the Echeveria, Graptoveria, Pachyveria and other Echeveria hybrids, they are usually orange, red or yellow. In one instance, the only way to determine a Graptoveria succulent from an Echeveria succulent is by the flower it produces!  (What is the difference between an Echeveria and Graptoveria succulent?)

The size of the flower depends on the size of the plant.  My Echeveria Strawberry Heart is large and thus has large flowers (see below left).  Conversely, a small Graptoveria Fred Ives has tiny flowers. (Below right).

Echeveria flower close up

Echeveria Strawberry Heart

Eceheveria Flowers

Echeveria Strawberrry Ripple

Graptoveria Flower

Graptoveria Fred Ives

Graptoveria Flower

Graptoeria Fred Ives

Monocarpic Succulents
As mentioned above, some succulents – such as some Agaves, Aeoniums and Sempervivums will flower and then the parent plant will die. These succulents are known as being – ‘monocarpic’.  However, the plant will produce many babies/offsets during the flowering of the mother plant so it is not too devastating for the owner! (Which succulents die after flowering?)

Winter Flowering Succulents
Aeonium succulents are Winter flowering, also monocarpic (see above).  You can often see them growing on the side of the road as they are very hardy.  They can be quite untidy succulents while the flower and the attached stem is dying.

Aeonium Undulatam

What should I do when the flowers die?
You can prune the dying flower stems at any time.  Usually the stems start to look unsightly which is when I prune mine.  If you do not prune them they will eventually shrivel up and drop off by themselves.

Do succulents flower when grown indoors?
Succulents ‘rarely’ bloom when they are grown indoors.  In their natural habitat they can require high temperatures in summer to trigger flowers to grow. Air conditioned houses do not provide these high temperatures.Conversely some succulents need winter dormancy and cold temperatures to induce flowers. Light and water conditions are also conducive to whether a succulent flowers or not.

Succulents (in flower) from my Garden
Aeonium Pinwheel
The Aeonium Pinwheel is a very compact plant that is hardy and easy to establish.  This year is the first time mine has flowered, (it has been growing for approximately 3 years) It is Monocarpic, so the stem from which the succulent has flowered will die, however, the rest of the plant growing from other stems should survive.  Below is a photo of the flower which is quite stunning.

Aeonium Pinwheel flower Aeonium Pinwheel Flower Aeonium Pinwheel

Kalanchoe
 This succulent is usually sold for Mother’s Day as it has beautiful flowers of white, red, pink or orange.  This succulent flowers in the spring.

Kalanchoe flower Kalanchoe Succulent Flowers

 

Which succulents die after flowering?

Which succulents die after flowering?

I was shocked and a bit devastated when I found out that some succulents die after flowering.  It’s not something you should blurt out to a novice succulent lover!  But do not worry, of the thousands of different succulents there are only a very small number that are ‘monocarpic’.

Monocarpic plants flower, set seed and then die. Other words with the same meaning are hapaxanth and semelparous.  However monocarpic is the term that is used to describe the succulent process.  Probably because it is easier to say!

Monocarpic plants can be divided into annuals, biennials and perennials. Annuals flower and set seed in one year, biennials two seasons and perennials sometimes take many years to flower.

So the question is: how long does a succulent live before it flowers??  The good new is:  Succulents that are monocarpic can still live a long life as they are perennials.  Below are the succulents that I am aware are monocarpic.

Agave – Attenuata/Americana (Century Plant)
The above monocarpic Agave’s can take 10 -25 years before the parent plant flowers.  When it is ready the plant uses all its energy to produce a thick stem which grows from the centre of the rosette in a relatively short period of time – sometimes less than a week. The stem can grow up to 2.5 metres (8 feet) high.  The Americana (Century Plant) has a stem that can grow to 9 metres (30 feet).  Once it flowers the parent plant will wither and die, Compared to other succulents the Agave parent plant can take months or even years to die.  Agave pups grow along the stem of the flower, these can be harvested and replanted.  Any pups that have grown off to the side of the plant will not die, only the rosette that has produced the flower stem.

Some, but not all, Agave are moncarpic.

Variegated Agave Succulent

Sempervivum
All succulents in the Sempervivum genus are monocarpic.  At first this made me think twice about buying Sempervivum succulents. Each rosette only flowers once and then dies. However, most species produce lots of offsets which makes up for any loss after flowering.  It will take 3 to 4 years for the rosette to produce a flower and die, in this time the parent plant would have produced many pups/babies to continue on in your garden.

monocarpic sempervivum

Sempervivum Tectorum

In Europe they are known as ‘houseleeks’ but in the USA Sempevervivum are known as Hen & Chicks.  However, some people call the Echeveria genus Hen & Chicks as well. Thus, it can get very confusing and people think that their Echeveria succulents are monocarpic.  It is ‘only’ Sempervivum Hen & Chicks which are monocarpic not Echeveria.

There are some Sempervivum and Echeveria that look very similar, they both have rosettes.  If you think your succulent is a Sempervivum and it flowers – from the centre of the rosette- and does not die – suffice to say this is an Echeveria.

The photos of the sempervivum below show small offsets from the sides.  These can be mistaken for flowers.  They are not flowers but new plants/pups sprouting.  When a Sempervivum flowers it is from the centre of its rosette, not to the side.

 

Aeonium
Some Aeonium will flower within two years while others may take 10-20 years before they flower. They die completely after flowering but before do they will have produced offsets as well as large numbers of seeds. Not all Aeonium die after flowering, but for the one’s that do it is too late for the plant once the flower stalk starts to develop.

Aeonium Aboreum Fire Wise Succulent

I found this Aeonium (below) in a nursery.  It looks very pretty, but as it was flowering I figured it wouldn’t have a very long life span in my garden if it was an Aeonium that was monocarpic!  Something to be aware of for monocarpic succulents.

Aeonium flowering

Kalanchoe 
The Kalanchoe ‘Flapjack’ is a monocarpic plant, once the Kalanchoe flowers new “baby plants” can be seen at the base of the plant and along the flower stalk. They can easily be propagated from the stalk.

IMG_5799Propagating Kalanchoes after bloomed!

So, if you have any of the monocarpic succulents you should be prepared for its dramatic flowering death at some point!